CONSTRUCTION SCHEDULING IS AN IMPORTANT TOOL

imagesConstruction scheduling is an important tool for planning, managing, and forecasting the performance of work on construction projects.   Generally CPM (critical path method) schedules, or schedules depicting the project’s critical path, are prepared beginning with the baseline schedule (the initial as-planned schedule) followed by schedule updates (perhaps monthly updates) as the work progresses.  Schedules identify milestone dates (such as the substantial completion date) as well as the dates and durations of construction activities / tasks.

 

Check out this chart for understanding key terms and meanings when it comes to CPM (critical path method) scheduling. 

 

Besides scheduling being a tool used for project management, schedules are helpful in assessing and measuring delays to the critical path, the acceleration of activities, and inefficiencies

 

Finally, check out this article for more information on the importance of understanding construction scheduling for strong project management.

 

 

Please contact David Adelstein at dadelstein@gmail.com or (954) 361-4720 if you have questions or would like more information regarding this article. You can follow David Adelstein on Twitter @DavidAdelstein1.

 

CHARTS AND GRAPHICS SUMMARIZING PAYMENT BOND AND CONSTRUCTION LIEN RIGHTS

 

imagesAs they say, a picture is worth a 1,000 words.  How about charts and graphics?

 

Check out this chart that summarizes preserving and enforcing construction lien and payment bond rights in Florida.

 

Check out this chart that summarizes Miller Act payment bond rights in comparison to Florida private and public payment bond rights.

 

Check out this graphic that depicts Miller Act payment bond claimants.

 

And, finally, check out this graphic that depicts those entities entitled to construction liens and payment bond rights under Florida law.

 

 

Please contact David Adelstein at dadelstein@gmail.com or (954) 361-4720 if you have questions or would like more information regarding this article. You can follow David Adelstein on Twitter @DavidAdelstein1.

 

CHART SUMMARIZING ENFORCEMENT OF CONSTRUCTION LIEN AND PAYMENT BOND RIGHTS

Previously, I included a chart that summarizes the preliminary notice requirements for construction liens and payment bonds in Florida.  This chart focuses on steps a potential lienor / claimant must undertake to preserve lien or payment bond rights.

 

Now that the lienor / claimant preserved its rights to record a lien or pursue a claim against the payment bond, what are the next steps to undertake if in fact that lienor is owed money?  To follow-up on this preliminary notice chart is a chart that summarizes these next steps of enforcing the lienor’s / claimant’s rights against the real property (in the case of a lien) or the payment bond.

 

Download (PDF, 281KB)

 

 

Please contact David Adelstein at dadelstein@gmail.com or (954) 361-4720 if you have questions or would like more information regarding this article. You can follow David Adelstein on Twitter @DavidAdelstein1.

CHART SUMMARIZING PRELIMINARY NOTICE REQUIREMENTS FOR LIENS AND PAYMENT BONDS

In previous articles, I discussed preliminary notice requirements to properly preserve construction liens and payment bonds on private projects, payment bonds on public projects, and public payments bonds for Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) projects.  Now, how about a chart that assists in summarizing this information:

 

QUESTION?CONSTRUCTION LIENPRIVATE PAYMENT BOND (FLA. STAT. 713.23)PUBLIC PAYMENT BOND (FLA. STAT. 255.05)FDOT PAYMENT BOND (FLA. STAT. 337.18)
QUESTION?CONSTRUCTION LIENPRIVATE PAYMENT BOND (FLA. STAT. 713.23)PUBLIC PAYMENT BOND (FLA. STAT. 255.05)FDOT PAYMENT BOND (FLA. STAT. 337.18)
Who needs to serve a preliminary notice?If not in privity of contract with the ownerIf not in privity of contract with the general contractorIf not in privity of contract with the general contractorIf not in privity of contract with the general contractor
What type of preliminary notice do I need to serve?Notice to OwnerNotice of Intent to Look to BondNotice of Intent to Look to BondNotice of Intent to Look to Bond
What is the time frame to serve the preliminary notice?Within 45 days of initial furnishingWithin 45 days of initial furnishingWithin 45 days of initial furnishingWithin 90 days of initial furnishing
Who should I serve the preliminary notice on?Owner, general contractor, lienor's customer's customer, and persons identified in the Notice of CommencementGeneral contractorGeneral ContractorGeneral Contractor

 

Please contact David Adelstein at dadelstein@gmail.com or (954) 361-4720 if you have questions or would like more information regarding this article. You can follow David Adelstein on Twitter @DavidAdelstein1.