60-DAY CLOCK FOR STATUTORY BAD FAITH “CURE PERIOD” STARTS WHEN CIVIL REMEDY NOTICE ELECTRONICALLY FILED

The Second District Court of Appeal in Harper v. Geico General Insurance Company, 44 Fla.L.Weekly D618c (Fla. 2d DCA 2019) explained that the 60-day clock for a statutory bad faith cure period STARTS when the civil remedy notice is electronically filed with Florida’s Department of Financial Services:

 

 

Subsection 624.155(3)(d) plainly states that no action shall lie if the damages are paid or corrective action is taken within sixty days after the insured files the CRN [Civil Remedy Notice]. Under current procedures, an insured files a CRN with the Department electronically. See Fla. Admin. Code R. 69J-123.002(1). And while the Department also requires the insured to print a copy of the completed CRN from the Department’s website and send it to the insurer, the Department nevertheless considers the form to be “filed” when the insured clicks the “submit” button at the end of the electronic form. See Civil Remedy Notice of Insurer Violations FAQ, https://apps.fldfs.com/CivilRemedy/Help.aspx (follow “Continue” hyperlink; then follow “How do I file a Civil Remedy Notice?” hyperlink) (last visited Dec. 20, 2018). At that time, the CRN is assigned a “filing number” and any changes must be made by clicking on “edit filing.” Hence, the requirements of section 624.155(3)(d) are met when the insured electronically files the CRN with the Department, and that action starts the sixty-day cure period for the insurer. Therefore, we hold that the sixty-day cure period under section 624.155 begins when the CRN is electronically filed with the Department, and to avoid a bad faith action, the insurer must pay the claim or take corrective action within sixty days from the date the CRN is electronically filed.

 

This is important because the insurer must fail to cure within this 60-day period to trigger the requirements of a statutory bad faith claim.  If the insurer fails to cure within this 60-day cure period, the insured has preserved an argument for a statutory bad faith claim.  See Harper, supra (“Therefore, because GEICO did not pay Harper’s claim within sixty days of the date the CRN was electronically filed with the Department, it did not pay the claim within the sixty-day cure period, and Harper was entitled to pursue her action for GEICO’s alleged bad faith.”).

 

Please contact David Adelstein at dadelstein@gmail.com or (954) 361-4720 if you have questions or would like more information regarding this article. You can follow David Adelstein on Twitter @DavidAdelstein1.

PROPERTY INSURER INVOKING APPRAISAL UNDER PROPERTY INSURANCE POLICY

shutterstock_398442106Property insurance policies routinely contain an appraisal provision.   The provision may read something to the effect:

 

 

 

If you and we fail to agree on the amount of loss, either may request an appraisal of the loss. However, both parties must agree to the appraisal. In this event, each party will choose a competent and impartial appraiser within 20 days after receiving a written request from the other. . . . If they fail to agree, they will submit their differences to the umpire. A decision agreed to by any two will set the amount of the loss.

 

Safepoint Insur. Co. v. Gomez, 44 Fla.L.Weekly D239b (Fla. 3d DCA 2019).

 

In Safepoint, the Third District Court of Appeal maintained if the property insurer invokes appraisal, it waives the right to subsequently demand compliance with post-loss conditions in the policy as a condition precedent to that appraisal.  (“‘Appraisal exists for a limited purpose – the determination of the amount of loss.’” By invoking appraisal pursuant to the terms of the insurance policy, Safepoint [insurer] waived the requirement of compliance with post-loss obligations as a condition precedent to that appraisal.”)  Safepoint, supra (internal citation omitted). 

 

In Safepoint, the insured (policyholder) submitted a property insurance claim.  The insurer sent payment for the covered loss, but the amount of payment was disputed.  As a result, the insurer invoked the appraisal process in the property insurance policy, and the insured agreed.  As the appraisal process was underway and an umpire selected, the insurer sent a letter to the insured demanding a sworn statement in proof of loss, examinations under oath, and additional documentation—post-loss requirements of the insured in the insurance policy.  The insured did not comply and the insurer used this non-compliance as an excuse to deny the claim.  This prompted the insured to file a breach of contract lawsuit against the insurer and move to compel the insurer to complete the appraisal process that it invoked. The trial court agreed, as affirmed by the Third District.  The insurer could not refuse to complete the appraisal process that it invoked by thereafter requiring the insured to comply with post-loss conditions in the policy.

 

Please contact David Adelstein at dadelstein@gmail.com or (954) 361-4720 if you have questions or would like more information regarding this article. You can follow David Adelstein on Twitter @DavidAdelstein1.

 

CGL INSURER’S DUTY TO DEFEND BROADER THAN DUTY TO INDEMNIFY AND BASED ON ALLEGATIONS IN UNDERLYING COMPLAINT

shutterstock_111496388The duty to defend an insured with respect to a third-party claim is broader than the duty to indemnify the insured for that claim.  The duty to defend is triggered by allegations in the underlying complaint. However, an insurer is only required to indemnify its insured for damages covered under the policy.   A recent case example demonstrating the duty to defend is broader than the duty to indemnify can be found in Southern Owners Ins. Co. v. Gallo Building Services, Inc., 2018 WL 6619987 (M.D.Fla. 2019).  

 

In this case, a homebuilder built a 270-unit condominium project where the units were included in 51-buildings.  Upon turnover of the condominium association to the unit owners, the condominium association served a Florida Statutes Chapter 558 Notice of Construction Defects letter. There was numerous nonconforming work spread out among various subcontractor trades including nonconforming stucco work.  The homebuilder incurred significant costs to repair defective work and resulting property damage, and relocated unit owners during repairs.  The homebuilder then filed a lawsuit against implicated subcontractors.  One of the implicated subcontractors was the stucco subcontractor.

 

 

The stucco subcontractor’s insurer filed an action for declaratory relief claiming it had NO duty to defend or indemnify the subcontractor in the underlying action because the subcontractor had a stucco/EIFS exclusion through an endorsement in its policy, referred tp as the “Exterior Finishing System and Stucco Exclusion.”  The subcontractor’s policy also did not contain a subcontractor exception to the “your work” exclusion.

 

Regarding the elimination of the subcontractor exception to the “your work” exclusion, the Court noted that the elimination of the subcontractor exception was largely irrelevant since the stucco subcontractor was a subcontractor so its work was not the entire project (unlike the homebuilder or general contractors’ work). Rather, the stucco subcontractor’s work was its scope of work and the underlying complaint referenced damages beyond the stucco subcontractor’s own work to other building components.  Thus, based on the allegations in the underlying complaint, the “your work” exclusion was not a basis to deny the duty to defend.

 

Regarding the stucco exclusion, the homebuilder argued that the subcontractor performed work outside of stucco work and the underlying complaint contained allegations unrelated to the application of stucco including framing work, miscellaneous work, and wrapping the buildings.  In other words, the Court did not have sufficient evidence that each allegation of nonconforming work related to the stucco subcontractor related to or arose out of the installation of stucco to trigger the full application of the stucco exclusion. Thus, this was not a basis to deny the subcontractor the duty to defend.

 

At this time, it is uncertain the magnitude of covered damages under the policy in light of the stucco exclusion and property damage resulting from the subcontractor’s defective work (certainly an issue to consider).  However, the insurer owed the subcontractor a duty to defend based on the allegations in the underlying complaint demonstrating the importance of crafting allegations in the underlying complaint.   The insurer’s indemnification obligation for covered damages, however, may be a different story and it is uncertain how a stucco subcontractor could have an endorsement that contains a stucco exclusion.  Take a look at your policy and, particularly, endorsements that further restrict coverage to ensure you do not have an exclusion relating to your own scope of work that would negate the value of the policy to you for property damage claims.

 

 

Please contact David Adelstein at dadelstein@gmail.com or (954) 361-4720 if you have questions or would like more information regarding this article. You can follow David Adelstein on Twitter @DavidAdelstein1.

 

CGL POLICY COVERING ATTORNEY’S FEES IN PROPERTY DAMAGE CLAIMS

shutterstock_195189626Does a CGL policy cover attorney’s fees and costs in property damages claims, to the extent there is a contractual or statutory basis to recover attorney’s fees? Naturally, you need to review the policies and this is not a clear-cut issue, but there is law to argue under.  

 

A case I have argued in support of CGL policies providing for coverage for attorney’s fees as a component of property damage claims when there is a contractual or statutory basis is Assurance Co. of America v. Lucas Waterproofing Co., Inc., 581 F.Supp.2d 1201 (S.D.Fla. 2008).  In this case, the following applied:

 

-The policy provided coverage for “those sums that the insured becomes legally obligated to pay as damages of… ‘property damage’….

– Property damage was defined as “physical injury to tangible property, including all resulting loss of use of that property.”

-The term damage, in of itself, was not defined in the policy.

 

The trial court looked at whether  attorneys’ fees and costs are damages arising because of ‘property damage’ to which the insurance policy at issue applies.  

 

If an insurer may defend against a claim that is covered by the policy without taking into account potential attorneys’ fees and costs that will be awarded if the opposing party prevails, the insurer creates an externality whereby, in the course of seeking to minimize its own liability, it imposes potential costs on the insured at no additional cost to itself.  This externality undermines the very reason why an insurer can at once possess a duty and a right to defend, which is that the interests of the insured and the insurer are presumed to be aligned with respect to a claim for damages covered by the policy.  Every dollar of liability for a covered claim for which the insured cannot be held liable is a dollar saved by the insurance company.  If, however, when defending against a claim that is covered by the policy, an insurer can increase the liability of the insured while simultaneously decreasing its own liability, the interests of the insurer and insured are no longer aligned, giving rise to a conflict between the insurer and insured and making the coexistence of the right and duty to defend untenable. 

***

Therefore, this Court finds that attorneys’ fees and costs that an insured becomes obligated to pay because of a contractual or statutory provision, which are attributable to an insurer’s duty to defend the insured against claims that would be covered by the policy if the claimant prevails, constitute damages because of ‘property damage” within the meaning of a CGL policy.

Assurance Co. of America, 581 F.Supp.2d at 1214-15. 

 

In July of 2018, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals reached a similar conclusion in Association of Apartment Owners of Moorings, Inc. v. Dongbu Insurance Co., Ltd., 731 Fed.Appx. 713 (9thCir. 2018). The issue on appeal was whether the liability insurer was required to indemnify its insured for attorneys’ fees its insured was ordered to pay against a third-party that prevailed on a water damage claim.  Similar to above, the policy did not define the term “damage” and the Ninth Circuit explained:

 

The policy provides coverage for damages Moorings [insured] must pay “because of” covered property damage.  This phrase, which is undefined, connotes a non-exacting causation requirement whereby any award of damages that flows from covered property damage is covered, unless otherwise excluded.  The Bradens [third-party claimant] were awarded fees…because their home incurred water damage, and they incurred additional loss in order to recover for this damage.  The fee award is thus properly considered an award of damages that Moorings must pay “because of” that covered property damage and is not otherwise excluded. 

Association of Apartment Owners of Moorings, Inc., 731 Fed.Appx. at 714.

 

 

 

 

Please contact David Adelstein at dadelstein@gmail.com or (954) 361-4720 if you have questions or would like more information regarding this article. You can follow David Adelstein on Twitter @DavidAdelstein1.