NEGLIGENCE OF PROPERTY APPRAISER

shutterstock_431491873A new appellate decision came out discussing the statute of limitations associated with a negligence claim against a property appraiser.   In this case, Llano Financing Group, LLC v. Petit, 42 Fla. L. Weekly D2071a (Fla. 1st DCA 2017), the court held that the four year statute of limitations for negligence claims commences when the lender relied on the appraisal to fund the loan.   The statute of limitations does not commence years later when the property is ultimately sold at a loss.  Oh no.  Once the lender receives the appraisal and funds the loan, the statute of limitations for the negligence claim begins.  Applying this rationale in other contexts, the statute of limitations to sue a property appraiser in negligence would commence once an appraisal is received and relied on.   This is best explained by the following hypothetical footnoted by the court:

 

Consider this example: An appraiser negligently appraises a $100,000 house at $150,000. A buyer reasonably relies on that negligent appraisal and buys the $100,000 house for $150,000. The buyer’s damages ($50,000) are easily determined immediately after the sale. Those damages would be the same whether the buyer promptly sold the home at a loss, lived in it forever, or sold it for $200,000 after decades of market appreciation.

Llano Financing Group, supra, n. 3.

 

 

If you feel like you suffered a loss at the hands of a negligent appraisal, make sure you consult counsel.  Based on the court’s decision in this case, the lender’s statute of limitations expired.  Make sure this does not happen to you.

 

Please contact David Adelstein at dadelstein@gmail.com or (954) 361-4720 if you have questions or would like more information regarding this article. You can follow David Adelstein on Twitter @DavidAdelstein1.

NEGLIGENT PROCUREMENT OF INSURANCE

shutterstock_540587629As you know, insurance is an important part of risk assessment for many, many business needs.  Oftentimes, an insured relies on an insurance broker or agent to procure specific insurance to meet its express business objectives and risks.  Notably, there is a potential negligence claim associated with an insurance agent or broker’s negligent procurement of insurance for an insured.  While this is not the easiest claim to prove, a recent Third District case explained this standard:

 

It is well settled that “where an insurance agent or broker undertakes to obtain insurance coverage for another person and fails to do so, he may be held liable for resulting damages for . . . negligence.  More specifically, and as applicable here, “[a]n agent is required to use reasonable skill and diligence, and liability may result from a negligent failure to obtain coverage which is specifically requested or clearly warranted by the insured’s expressed needs.”  As explained by our sister court, “[t]his general duty requires the agent to exercise due care in correctly advising the insured of the existence and availability of particular insurance, including the availability and desirability of obtaining higher limits, depending on the scope of the agents undertaking.” 

Kendall South Medical Center, Inc. v. Consolidated Ins. Nation, Inc., 42 Fla. L. Weekly D1071a (Fla. 3d DCA 2017) (internal quotations omitted).

 

 

In this case, a leak occurred on commercial leased premises.  The commercial tenant had a property insurance policy that provided $100,000 of coverage for the physical improvements and contents of the property.  However, there was a 90% coinsurance provision.  A coinsurance provision shifts risk to the insured when the insured purchases less coverage than the value of the property. 

 

As a result of the coinsurance provision, the insured only received a fraction of its damages, and less than the $100,000 in coverage.    The insured, however, claimed it was under the belief it would recover $100,000 in insurance proceeds as that was what it told its agent it needed.  The insured sued its insurance agent claiming the agent’s failure to advise it that the procured policy did not address its expressed insurance needs. “[W]hen an insured alleges that it specifically communicated its insurance needs to an agent who then undertook to procure a policy addressing such needs, the insured states a cause of action for negligent procurement where it also alleges that, without providing an explanation that different coverage was required, the agent procured a policy not meeting those expressed needs.”  Kendall South Medical Center, supra.

 

Perhaps this could have been avoided had the insured reviewed the specific terms of the insurance policy.  Perhaps there are e-mails or other records where the insurance agent explained that the coverage the insured was seeking could not be procured without a coinsurance provision that shifted the risk to the insured.  Know your insurance and know the risks and coverage afforded to you!

 

Please contact David Adelstein at dadelstein@gmail.com or (954) 361-4720 if you have questions or would like more information regarding this article. You can follow David Adelstein on Twitter @DavidAdelstein1.

DESIGN PROFESSIONAL NEEDS A LICENSE TO BE SUED FOR PROFESSIONAL NEGLIGENCE

imagesWith regard to claims for professional negligence, the Florida Supreme Court has explained that ‘where the negligent party is a professional, the law imposes a duty to perform the requested services in accordance with the standard of care used by similar professionals in the community under similar circumstances.’” Sunset Beach Investments, LLC v. Kimley-Horn and Associates, 42 Fla. L. Weekly D130a (Fla. 4th DCA 2017) quoting Moransais v. Heathman, 744 So.2d 973, 975-76 (Fla. 1999).

 

When it comes to professional negligence, two things are important:

 

1)  the person being sued is a professional under the law (person has special education, training, experience, and skill) and

2)   the standard of care for that professional (e.g, licensed, professional engineer).

  

In a recent case, an engineering intern—not, a licensed, professional engineer–was sued for professional negligence.   The Fourth District Court of Appeal held that an engineering intern is not a person that can be sued for professional negligence, unlike a licensed, professional engineer. Sunset Beach Investments, supra.

  

The Fourth District explained that an engineering intern, by way of example, is not a professional because an engineering intern does not maintain a license.  If the court treated an engineering intern as a professional than it would be walking down a slippery slope when it came to who is a professional and who is not.   Instead of walking down that slippery slope, the court stated: “At a minimum, in a profession where a license exists, the existence of a license is a valid barometer for determining whether a person is classified as a professional. “ Sunset Beach Investments, supra.

 

Please contact David Adelstein at dadelstein@gmail.com or (954) 361-4720 if you have questions or would like more information regarding this article. You can follow David Adelstein on Twitter @DavidAdelstein1.

 

 

 

 

 

DESIGN PROFESSIONAL’S DUTY OF CARE NOT EXTENDED TO SUBCONTRACTORS

images3M3BYH2WIn construction defect lawsuits, subcontractors responsible for the alleged deficient work or damage are third-partied into the lawsuit by the general contractor that hired them.  And, sometimes, an owner (or association) tries to assert a claim directly against responsible subcontractors.   There are times where subcontractors have the defense that the deficiencies and damages complained of are the result of design errors and omissions.  A question becomes whether a subcontractor can assert a negligence claim directly against that design professional as a way to flow any potential exposure to the design professional.

 

Unfortunately, there is case law that says that a supervising design professional does NOT owe any duty of care to a subcontractorSee Spancrete, Inc. v. Ronald E. Frazier & Associates, P.A., 630 So.2d 1197 (Fla. 3d DCA 1994) (duty of care that supervising architect owed to general contractor did not extend to subcontractors); McElvy, Jennewein, Stefany, Howard, Inc. v. Arlington Electric, Inc., 582 So.2d 47 (Fla. 2d DCA 1991) (trial court erred in allowing case to go to jury because architect’s duty of care could not have been extended to subcontractors); E.C. Goldman, Inc. v. A/R/C Associates, Inc., 543 So.2d 1268 (Fla. 5th DCA 1989) (consulting engineering/expert firm hired by owner to inspect and advise owner about roof owed no duty of care to roofing subcontractor).  Without this duty of care, a subcontractor would NOT be able to pursue a negligence claim against the design professional because this duty of care is the very first element required to prove a negligence claim.  (In order to prove a negligence claim, a plaintiff needs to prove that 1) the defendant owed the plaintiff a duty of care, 2) the defendant breached that duty of care, 3) that breach proximately caused damages/injuries to the plaintiff, and 4) the plaintiff was damaged/injured.)  This does mean the subcontractor cannot assert the design professional’s errors and omissions as a defense, it just means that it will be an uphill battle for a subcontractor to assert an affirmative claim against the design professional.

 

Please contact David Adelstein at dadelstein@gmail.com or (954) 361-4720 if you have questions or would like more information regarding this article. You can follow David Adelstein on Twitter @DavidAdelstein1.