BAD FAITH IN THE CONTEXT OF PROPERTY INSURANCE CLAIMS (WEBINAR)

Recently, I participated in a national webinar involving insurance bad faith in the property insurance context.  My section of the webinar dealt with the elements and burden of proof in demonstrating bad faith by an insurer in various jurisdictions.  If you are dealing with a property insurance claim, or believe there may have been bad faith by the insurer, make sure you are working with counsel equipped to handle the jurisdictional nuances in advising you of your rights and proving such a claim.

 

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Please contact David Adelstein at dadelstein@gmail.com or (954) 361-4720 if you have questions or would like more information regarding this article. You can follow David Adelstein on Twitter @DavidAdelstein1.

QUICK NOTE: SUBMITTING CIVIL REMEDY NOTICE

imagesThere are steps an insured or claimant need to take in order to assert a statutory bad faith claim.  The first step is the obligatory Civil Remedy Notice.  This obligation is set forth in Florida Statute s. 624.155.   The Civil Remedy Notice is, in essence, written notice of the specific violation(s) that are being claimed against the insurer that give rise to potential bad faith and an opportunity for the insurer to cure the violation(s).   Florida Statute s. 624.155 would not be confused as a model of clarity, so it is important that a insured or claimant work with an attorney regarding any bad faith claim including filling out the Civil Remedy Notice.  

 

In Fox v. Starr Indemnity & Liability Co., 2017 WL 1541294 (M.D.Fla. 2017), an insured sued his property insurer for bad faith.  Prior to suing, the insured submitted the required Civil Remedy Notice.  However, the insurer moved to dismiss the lawsuit under the argument that the insured did not strictly comply with the statutory requirements based on how the insured filled out the Notice.   The insurer argued this because if the Civil Remedy Notice was deficient than the statutory bad faith claim would not be triggered.  The Middle District, reviewing this issue, maintained, that substantial compliance with the statutory requirements would suffice.  The Middle District was not going to toss out a bad faith claim based on technicalities with how the Civil Remedy Notice was filled out when the insured substantially complied with the intent of the requirements.

 

Pursuing a bad faith claim against an insurer is not as easy as it may appear.  There are steps and requirements that must occur before the bad faith claim can even be pursued. The first step is submitting the Civil Remedy Notice pursuant to Florida Statute s. 624.155.  But, this is not the only step.  Check out this article for more information on bad faith.  

 

Please contact David Adelstein at dadelstein@gmail.com or (954) 361-4720 if you have questions or would like more information regarding this article. You can follow David Adelstein on Twitter @DavidAdelstein1.

 

BAD FAITH IN THE FIRST-PARTY INSURANCE CONTEXT

unknownIn a previous article I discussed bad faith when it comes to an insurance claim.  Recently, in Barton v. Capitol Preferred Insurance Co., Inc., 41 Fla. L. Weekly D2736b (Fla. 5th DCA 2016), the court discussed bad faith in the first-party insurance context (i.e., a property / homeowners insurance policy). 

 

 

In this case, homeowners, as the insured, sued their homeowners insurance carrier for sinkhole coverage. The homeowner filed a Civil Remedy Notice of Insurer Violation (also known as a Civil Remedy Notice) against their insurer with the Florida Department of Insurance in accordance with Florida Statute s. 624.155This Civil Remedy Notice is a prerequisite to initiating such a bad faith claim; the notice specifies the statutory violations committed by the insurer and gives the insurer 60 days to cure the violation.

 

The insurer denied the assertions in the Civil Remedy Notice. Thereafter, the homeowners served a proposal for settlement / offer of judgment trying to settle the claim for $65,000.  The insurer paid $65,000 and the lawsuit was dismissed.  But, the proposal for settlement did not require the homeowners to release the insurer.  In other words, there was no release of any bad faith insurance claim. So, naturally, the homeowners refiled a lawsuit against their homeowners insurance carrier for bad faith.

 

[A] bad-faith action is premature until there is a determination of liability [coverage] and extent of damages owed on the first-party insurance contract.” Barton, supra. citing Vest v. Travelers Ins. Co., 753 So.2d 1270, 1276 (Fla. 2000).  An insured can obtain a determination of liability through an agreed settlement, arbitration, or stipulation—the determination of liability / coverage does not have to be made through trialId. quoting Fridman v. Safeco Ins. Co. of Ill., 185 So.3d 1214, 1224 (Fla. 2016). 

 

Here, the court held that there was a determination of liability because the insurer paying the insured-homeowners $65,000 was a favorable resolution to the homeowners.  It did not matter that the $65,000 was less than the insured’s original demand or less than the policy limits for sinkhole coverage.  Why?  Because the settlement operated as a determination of liability and extent of the homeowners’ damages, thereby satisfying the condition precedent to filing a bad faith claim.   

 

This was a clever move by the homeowners not to give the insurer a release in consideration of the $65,000 (and not to condition the proposal for settlement on giving the insurer a release).  From an insurer’s standpoint, after it receives a Civil Remedy Notice and, then, a proposal for settlement, it should try to obtain such a release.  Perhaps the insurer tried hard to get that release but the homeowners were unwilling to give such a release.  This may have forced the insurer to pay the $65,000 pursuant to the proposal for settlement to minimize its exposure in the underlying insurance coverage dispute.  The fact that accepting a proposal for settlement can satisfy the determination of liability and extent of damages requirement (even if the proposal for settlement amount is less than any original demand) before initiating a bad faith claim may motivate insurers to negotiate and pay for a release that protects them from such bad faith claims.

 

Please contact David Adelstein at dadelstein@gmail.com or (954) 361-4720 if you have questions or would like more information regarding this article. You can follow David Adelstein on Twitter @DavidAdelstein1.

 

QUICK NOTE: COVERAGE MUST FIRST BE ESTABLISHED TO HAVE A BAD FAITH INSURANCE CLAIM

imagesIn order to have a bad faith insurance claim you must first establish that there was coverage under the insurance policy.  Otherwise, the bad faith claim is prematurely filed and will be dismissed or abated.  

 

Please contact David Adelstein at dadelstein@gmail.com or (954) 361-4720 if you have questions or would like more information regarding this article. You can follow David Adelstein on Twitter @DavidAdelstein1.